Rollerville Water Wheel at the termination of the Rollerville Flume

What is a flume? A log flume is a flume specifically constructed to transport lumber and logs down mountainous terrain using flowing water.

Where is Rollerville? Rollerville (sometimes called Flumeville) was just north of Point Arena. How did it get its name …….

The Garcia Mill was located up the Garcia River – it comes out to the sea at Gualala. A railroad wasn’t feasible to haul the cut lumber to the coast because of the terrain. Getting the lumber to close to the coast (six miles?) a flume was constructed. Here you can see the cut lumber being placed in the flume.

Loading lumber into the Rollerville Flume

Loading lumber into the Rollerville Flume

The flume stopped in front of a 10o foot high hill. And, how did the lumber get transported from the bottom to the top? A gigantic 24 foot high water wheel powered a hoist.

24 foot high water wheel

24 foot high water wheel

Look very carefully at the photo above. In the middle of the wheel a man is standing.

What happened to the lumber when it got to the top of the hill? Horse and car was used to haul the lumber to the chute that took the lumber from the top of the cliff down to the waiting schooners.

Chute used by Garcia Mill

Chute used by Garcia Mill

Elk/Greenwood L E White Lumber Co’s Crummy

First – What is a “Crummy”. It was an early term for a logger’s bed roll and possessions.Latterly it is the word used for the vehicle that hauls the loggers to the work site in the woods. From what one can gather it was usually a vehicle in deplorable condition and barely functional. Crummies weren’t vehicles that were the subject of the discerning photographer. This photo shows the crummy belonging (I think) to the L.E. White lumber Company of Elk/Greenwwod. It was on its way to Camp 11 one ridge east of Highway 1 and west of Cold Springs.

Crummy on the way to the woods

Crummy on the way to the woods

The propulsion is an automobile converted to rail pulling a flat car. No shelter for anyone, What a way to go to work!!!!!

Pomo of Southern Mendocino and Northern Sonoma Counties

This map comes from a book, “The Mendonoma Coast.”

Map of Pomo Villages along the Southern Mendocino Coast and Northern Sonoma Coast

Map of Pomo Villages along the Southern Mendocino Coast and Northern Sonoma Coast

As you can see there were lots of villages. Many of the villages were along the coast – the Pomo preferred the open spaces to the shadowy redwoods.

And today? Narry a one. Why? Well, I can assure you that they didn’t all die of old age.

CWR’s (California Western Railroad) M100 Railbus when she was yellow

CWR’s (California Western Railroad) M100 Railbus wasn’t always the colour she is now – maroon. For many years she was yellow. Here’s a gallery of her in her canary finery:

Remnants of Union Lumber Company’s (ULC) Branch found

The Union Lumber Company’s Ten Mile Branch ran from the Mill site in Fort Bragg north along the coast over five trestles till it came to Ten Mile River. At Ten Mile River the railroad made a huge sweeping turn to follow the river eastwards inland.

The ocean  front portion of the Ten Mile Railroad route is now a dedicated hiking and equestrian trail from Pudding Creek to Ten Mile. Between 1916 and 1949, the Ten Mile Railroad was a working logging line carrying few passengers except for woods workers and their families who lived in the camps along the Ten Mile River. After the change to truck hauling in 1949, Union Lumber and successors Boise-Cascade and Georgia-Pacific used the railroad route as a logging road until 1983 when winter storms damaged the oceanfront portion of the road. The old railroad bed east of the Ten Mile Bridge is still used by Georgia-Pacific [and its current owners] as a logging road.

The railroad was discontinued June 17, 1949 and replaced by a private trucking road, which in turn was abandoned in 1983. The road is now owned by the people of California through the State Parks system.

North of the access to MacKerricher State Park at Ward Avenue, the route of the Ten Mile Railroad enters the ocean side edge of the Ten Mile sand dunes. The transition point, where the bluffs end and the dunes begin, was the site of a major El Nino washout in February 1998 when the remains of an old railroad trestle could be seen after the pavement toppled to the beach. Subsequent storms washed away most of this trestle.

Remains of an Inlenook Fen Tresrle

Remains of an Inlenook Fen Tresrle

Last winter there was a lot of heavy surf and very high tides along the coast with a lot movement of the beach and much debris washed up. Club member Mike Aplet and his charming wife are great hikers. They recently (Spring 2017) walked along the beach along the Inglenook Fen section of the Ten Mile Branch found, and photographed – see below – pieces of the Inglenook Fen Trestle.

Bent Cap from the Inglenook Fen Trestle

Bent Cap from the Inglenook Fen Trestle

Bent Cap from the Inglenook Fen Trestle

Bent Cap from the Inglenook Fen Trestle

Rare photos of something long gone.

Thanks Mike.

 

Hand tinted postcards of Caspar, Mendocino

Hand tinted postcards began as a conventional black and white photograph and were painted by hand prior to production. In the early days the colouring took place in the photographers studio. As demand expanded factories were established employing large numbers of women to hand tint photographic images prior to postcard printing. The paints were oil based and transparent and their chemistry was such that many of the colourists were to suffer illness as a result of licking their brushes to form a point.

Our website contains a number of hand tinted postcards but none of Caspar until I found these two:

Very early photo of Caspar

Very early photo of Caspar

The log splash at Caspar

The log splash at Caspar

Interesting what?