1865, 1873, 1876, 1889, 1897,1910, 1994 and 2007 Maps of Noyo and old pictures of Noyo

Thanks to club member and muqquomp of Noyo harbour, Dusty Dillion we have some very interesting maps of Noyo. First is the 1865 map:

1865 map of mouth of the Noyo River

1865 map of mouth of the Noyo River

At the top of the 1865 map you can see the location of the Richardson mill -built by George Hegenmeyer.

Next is the 1873 map:

1873 Map of NOYO harbour showing site of mIL

1873 Map of Noyo harbour showing site of mIl

In the 1873 map you can see that the mill has moved downriver onto the flats on the north side.

The 1876 map:

1876 Map of Noyo Harbour showing land ownership

1876 Map of Noyo Harbour showing land ownership

This map does not show the mill but does show the road and the bridge over the Noyo for the first time.

The 1889 map shows the land has bee sub-divided along the coast road:

1889 Map of Noyo River showing land ownersip

1889 Map of Noyo River showing land ownership

The 1897 map is VERY interesting. Did you know that Fort Bragg had a race track? I sure didn’t. I don’t know if the track was for cars or horses. As there was car racing at Pine Grove just south of Noyo I’m guessing it was cars. The second really interesting piece of info from the map are the rail lines and chute in the upper left hand corner.

1897 Map of Noyo River showing location of race track and rail lines leading to wire loading place

1897 Map of Noyo River showing location of race track and rail lines leading to wire loading place

This picture that Dusty recently gave us shows the chute at work:

Noyo Harbour

Noyo Harbour

This pic, also from Dusty shows spectators watching the chute at work.

Watching the chute at work

Watching the chute at work

The 1910 map adds a few details to the 1897 map.

1910 Mao of Noyo River showing County Road

1910 Mao of Noyo River showing County Road

Lastly we have an aerial photo map showing how things have changes since “back then”.

1994 Aerial View of Noyo Basin

1994 Aerial View of Noyo Basin

Last, but not least is a street amp of the area around Noyo harbour dated 2007 which shows the growth in streets but interestingly the original coast road remians.

 

2007 Street Map of area around Noyo Basin

2007 Street Map of area around Noyo Basin

Thanks Dusty – your contribution and knowledge is invaluable.

 

The Lodge at Noyo River, Noyo just south of Fort Bragg, CA

Noyo was Noyo before Fort Bragg was Fort Bragg. Look at this Wells Fargo Pony Express letter addressed to Noyo.

Pony Express Letter to Noyo

Pony Express Letter to Noyo

In its heyday in the 1860’s there were three lumber mills operating full time at Noyo on what is called Noyo flats. It was a bustling community with three hotels, numerous saloons and assorted merchants. On the bluff above Noyo harbour sits the Lodge at Noyo River. The Lodge has been in operation since 1868 until its recent closure for renovations.

The Lodge at Noyo River

The Lodge at Noyo River

Alexander MacPherson, a young Scotsman living in San Francisco was the first to build a logging mill on Noyo Flats. During the construction of the mill he built a home on “Stony Point” and moved his family in. Some say he chose the spot so that he could count the logs from his window as the floated down river. His home has become the Lodge at Noyo River.

In 1908, Mr. Henry Holmes, another gentleman who made his living in the woods, purchased the property. Mr. Holmes was Superintendent of Woods for Charles R. (C.R.) Johnson’s ULC, the Union Lumber Company (then owner of the California Western Railroad – the “Skunk”). He was very likely the highest paid salaried man in the area.

The ULC was in the process of purchasing all the smaller independent mills for consolidation into one large mill on the two mile long property he owned in Fort Bragg. With the closure of the mills on Noyo flats the town moved to Fort Bragg.

Mr. Holmes remodeled and added onto the Noyo River House. A photo of the Holmes family enjoying the patio shortly after the completion of the renovation can be found in one of the hallways. The remodeling installed beautiful board and batten redwood paneling on walls and ceilings the inn. The Scandinavian shipwrights working as carpenters used the finest wood such as choice heartwood fir and clear redwood to create what locals believe to be one of the oldest and finest buildings in Noyo/Fort Bragg.

Bedroom in the Lodge

Bedroom in the Lodge

The Five Bridges across the Noyo River, Fort Bragg, CA.

I have been told several times that the current bridge across the Noyo River here in Fort Bragg is the fifth to span the river. Thanks to a friend of our club I have been given a pile of photographs and maps of the Noyo River from the 1850’s to fairly recently. Whilst sorting through the treasure trove I came across pictures of the bridges across the Noyo and yes there were five.

Have a look at what I was given:

Looking south across the first bridge over the Noyo circa 1870. John Byrne and John Warrington were given a franchise to build a toll drawbridge to replace the ferry that had been there. The road that became South Harbour Drive is a meandering dirt road.

Looking south across the first bridge over the Noyo circa 1870. John Byrne and John Warrington were given a franchise to build a toll drawbridge to replace the ferry that had been there. The road that became South Harbour Drive is a meandering dirt road.

1890 – A photograph showing the road James Townsend built on the south side of Noyo River and the second Noyo Bridge. This was another toll bridge and the small building at the far right end of the bridge was probably the toll house.

1890 – A photograph showing the road James Townsend built on the south side of Noyo River and the second Noyo Bridge. This was another toll bridge and the small building at the far right end of the bridge was probably the toll house.

1920 Panorama showing the Noyo River and Second Noyo Bridge

1920 Panorama showing the Noyo River and Second Noyo Bridge

1924 picture of the wreckage of the second bridge

1924 picture of the wreckage of the second bridge

1930 aerial picture showing the third A-Frame bridge across the Noyo River.

1930 aerial picture showing the third A-Frame bridge across the Noyo River.

Panorama of the third A-Frame bridge across the Noyo

Panorama of the third A-Frame bridge across the Noyo

1947 – The fourth bridge across the Noyo River being built

1947 – The fourth bridge across the Noyo River being built

The fourth bridge across the Noyo at sunset

The fourth bridge across the Noyo at sunset

The current, fifth, bridge across the Noyo River

The current, fifth, bridge across the Noyo River

Open Water Rowing Boats

The pictures in this blog are from our good friend Dusty Dillion who lives in Noyo Harbour, Fort Bragg.

If you read our website section on Ships you will quickly see just how many of them went to a watery grave. When I was putting the section together I was struck by the fact that the number of fatalities from the wrecks seemed to me to be relativity small.

Please understand I am a CPA and have virtually no knowledge of sea-faring matters save what I have learned from creating this website. It never occurred to me that the answer was lifeboats/rowing boats which were seaworthy. The penny dropped when Dusty gave me these two postcards of rowing boats built in Noyo Harbour here in Fort Bragg.

The first picture shows that sea going rowboats were large enough to hold the crew of a small vessel.

Open Water Rowing Boat in Noyo Harbour

Open Water Rowing Boat in Noyo Harbour

This second picture shows another Noyo Harbour built rowboat at sea. And as you can see the sea is quite rough.

Open Water Rowing Boat at Sea

Open Water Rowing Boat at Sea

Do I want to try? No thanks, I think I will stay on terra firma.

Noyo, The River and the Town near Fort Bragg California

Whilst I have been “loafing”  200 miles south at Stamford hospital for the last four days   getting chemo, tests et al our website guru, Roger Thornburn, has been incredibly busy working on scanning our latest “treasure” – a book about Noyo.

Before there was Fort Bragg (California that is) the community of Noyo existed on the banks of the River Noyo which now forms the southern boundary of Fort Bragg. A redwood mill and fishing provided the sources of income for the inhabitants. The most comprehensive source of information about the community is the 1986 book “The Noyo” by Beth Stebbins. Through the efforts of Noyo resident, Dusty Miller, we were given permission to add the book in its entirety to the website …… which kept Roger busy whilst I was up to no good down south.

If you click here you can read/look at all 122 pages of this long out of print book that Roger has put into e-form.

Bridges over the Noyo River at Fort Bragg

I drive over the bridge over the Noyo River probably every day of the week. The bridge we now drive on was built since we moved here in 2000. But what of the ones before?

I knew that before there was a town of Fort Bragg there was a community on the side of the Noyo River. Over the years there has been a ferry and a number bridges over the Noyo. I have been collecting Noyo River pics for a while and today I sorted them out. I think I have pics of all of the bridges. I think. If I am missing any or have the captions wrong I’d appreciate hearing about it.

Mouth of the River Noyo in the 1890’s

Mouth of the River Noyo in the 1890’s

Crossing the Noyo by ferry in the early days

Crossing the Noyo by ferry in the early days

 

Ferry crossing the Noyo River

Ferry crossing the Noyo River

First Bridge across the Noyo late 1800’s

First Bridge across the Noyo late 1800’s

Boating on the Noyo in the 1890's

Boating on the Noyo in the 1890’s

Noyo Bridge in the 1890’s

Noyo Bridge in the 1890’s

Mouth of the Noyo around 1900

Mouth of the Noyo around 1900

Mouth of the River Noyo in the 1920's

Mouth of the River Noyo in the 1920’s

Noyo River Bridge in the 1920’s

Noyo River Bridge in the 1920’s

Noyo with both bridges in. 1947 the new high bridge is not being use yet.

Noyo with both bridges in. 1947 the new high bridge is not being use yet.

Carine’s restaurant with the Noyo Bridge in the background

Carine’s restaurant with the Noyo Bridge in the background

View of the new high bridge over the Noyo in the 1940’s

View of the new high bridge over the Noyo in the 1940’s

Mouth of the Noyo River after the new high bridge was built

Mouth of the Noyo River after the new high bridge was built

A view of Noyo Harbour in the 1950's from the high bridge

A view of Noyo Harbour in the 1950’s from the high bridge