Hendy State Park

As may be seen from the pages in this blog there is a lot I do not know about the locale in which I live. So, when a visitor to our club’s (G scale) – layout which tells the story of logging along the Mendocino Coast – asks me what I know about the history of Hendy Woods (State Park) and I say, “Not very much. ” I think it behoves me as the club’s historian to get my act together and go looking.

First things first – where is it? Here’s a topo map to give you a heads up [Click on the map to enlarge it]:

Topo map showing the location of Hendy Woods State Park

Topo map showing the location of Hendy Woods State Park

Hendy Woods State Park is a state park of California, located in the Anderson Valley of Mendocino County. It is named after Joshua Hendy, who owned the land and stipulated that it be protected; it passed through several owners after Hendy died without being logged, before becoming part of the California State Park system in 1958. It is the only large park within the Anderson Valley. It is about 20 miles from the coast, and because of the distance, it is noticeably warmer than California’s coast redwood forests. The park can be reached via the Philo–Greenwood Road, just off California State Route 128.

The park covers 816 acres of land and contains two groves of old-growth coast redwood: Big Hendy (80 acres) and Little Hendy (20 acres). Some of the trees are over 300 feet tall and may be nearly 1,000 years old. Other trees in the woods include madrone, Douglas fir, and California laurel. The park also contains 3.3 miles of property along the banks of the Navarro River and provides the only public access to the river within the Anderson Valley.

The Pomo people lived in what is now Hendy Woods for thousands of years, supporting themselves as hunter-gatherers. The first western settlers in the region were Russian fur traders who claimed the Pomo lands and forced the Pomo people into servitude; today, the remaining Pomo people are greatly reduced in number.

Joshua Hendy, after whom Hendy Woods was named, was an English-born blacksmith who moved from Texas to California in the California Gold Rush and built a large sawmill on the Navarro River. When Hendy died in 1891, he willed the property to his nephews with a stipulation that the coast redwood groves in it be protected. However, his nephew Samuel Hendy eventually ran out of money and sold the property to the Pacific Coast Lumber Company. It was sold again in turn to the Albion Lumber Company, in 1930 to the Southern Pacific Land Company, and in 1948 to the Masonite Corporation, together with the land stretching from what is now the park to the coast. 

Through these changes of ownership, Hendy Woods remained unlogged and was a popular location for family picnics. In 1938, Al Strowbridge visited the Anderson Valley Unity Club (a local women’s service organization) and spoke to them about the redwood forests of California; from that time forward the Unity Club worked to save the remaining groves of redwoods, and in 1958 the California State Park system bought approximately 600 acres of land with two miles of river frontage from Masonite for US$350,000. From 1979 to 1988, several additional purchases brought the park up to its present size of 816 acres. 

Redwood In Hendy Woods

Redwood In Hendy Woods

Have I been there? Yes, but before we moved here in 2000. I remember going because of the Redwoods. Alas, I cannot find the photos I know that I took.

 

Logging at DeHaven on the Mendocino Coast

Unless you are a native to the Mendocino Coast you have probably never heard of Dehaven. DeHaven is located on California State Route 1 near the Pacific coast 1.5 miles north of Westport. The name honors John J. De Haven, congressman and Associate Justice of the California Supreme Court.

Here is a map of DeHaven’s location:

Map showing the location of DeHaven on the Mendocino Coast

Map showing the location of DeHaven on the Mendocino Coast

There was no shipping point at DeHaven. Why? All those “x” in the sea are known rocks. This map shows its proximity to Westport which was where the DeHaven’s mills lumber was shipped from :

Map showing DeHaven and Westport on the Mendocino Coast

Map showing DeHaven and Westport on the Mendocino Coast

The website is quite informative about Dehaven – see here. There is also a blog showing a picture of DeHaven’s one and only loco in a very sad state – see here. This pic is the first I have ubcovered of the town itself:

DeHaven store and a residence

DeHaven store and a residence

An enquiry about Fruto

I recently received this enquiry from a gentleman named Bob Maloney:

” I am seeking information and photographs for the line that in the late 1800s, intended to go to Mendocino County, ran from Willows to Fruto where there was a turntable for return. Logs, livestock, ore, ag products, general freight and passengers were transported. There is some history under “Fruto, CA, USA” on the internet. The line from Fruto to Mendocino County which never materialized (I think due to lack of funding). The tracks came up in about 1950.

I live in Fruto and am working (Module 1) on an N Scale duplication of Fruto 1888-1920 (plus or minus) but to scale as near as I can determine that. I need information on the location, size and facilities for loading cattle (corrals, scale, water tower, etc.), the location of the ore loading ramp (shown on the Fruto internet site), and the means by which logs were loaded onto rail cars. Any details about the roundtable and engine house west of it is unknown to me too. …………Willows actually had and has a “Y” but my Willows Loop will not be to scale and will only be a multiple track operation to reverse trains, sort cars, park and run trains, and just run them around in anticipation of returning to Fruto for the scale operation – i.e., someplace to go from Fruto.

So far my biggest lack of information in Fruto is how the logs were loaded as I have had stacks of logs described to me as seen by youngsters (at that time, older folks now) adjacent to the long north siding south of Cherry Street on the west end of that siding, but with no knowledge of how they were loaded. The corrals have been described to me as at the east end of that same siding. One inconsistency is the pile of logs that was seen north of the 3 east-west tracks (main plus siding on north and south sides) but I’m told when “a log pile caught fire it burned down the station” though the station was on the south side of the 3 east-west tracks. Maybe the fire went across all 3 tracks or maybe there were logs stacked elsewhere than as has been described to me on the north side. More history being sought.”

Until I received this e-mail I had never heard of Fruto. As is my wont I searched for a map of its location and I found a beauty [Click to see the detail]:

Fruto Topo Map

Fruto Topo Map

Next thing was to talk to our VP Lonnie Dickson who worked for SP (Southern Pacific) and late UP (Union Pacific) for many years and ask if he knew of Fruto. He more than knew it – he had been an engineer on the route depicted in the above map.  Whilst Lonnie remembered many details of the route he had no answers for Bob about log loading. After discussion we agreed that the process was probably not dissimilar to that used here on the Mendocino Coast. So here’s my effort at answering Bob’s question:

Before there came to be hayrick booms (cranes) powered by steam donkeys to lift logs onto the railroad flat cars the logs were rolled onto the flat cars. The photo below shows how:

Loading-logs-before-there-were-Spar-Trees-600x413

Loading-logs-before-there-were-Spar-Trees 

Using Hayrick Booms was the next innovation in the woods:

Hayrick boom in operation

Hayrick boom in operation

Hayrick boom in operation #2

Hayrick boom in operation #2

Hope the above helps Bob.

 

Douglas (Wyoming) Railroad Museum

Douglas, Wyoming isn’t a very big place – 6,120 people at the 2010 census. Its former railroad passenger depot is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Douglas was platted in 1886 when the Wyoming Central Railway (later the Chicago and North Western Transportation Company) established a railway station; the settlement had been in existence since 1867 when Fort Fetterman was built and was first known as “Tent City” before it was officially named “Douglas”, after Senator Stephen A. Douglas. It served as a supply point, warehousing and retail, for surrounding cattle ranches, as well as servicing railway crews, cowboys and the troops of the U.S. Army stationed at Fort Fetterman.

None of the above tells you why Club Member Dan Fessler went to visit Douglas – he went to the Railroad Museum there. The Douglas Railroad Museum is housed in the historic FE & MV Railroad Passenger Depot. The historic depot was updated in 2018 and today features exhibits highlighting Douglas and the region’s railroad history. The building is listed on the National Historic Register and is surrounded by seven historic railcars including the Chicago Burlington and Quincy Railroad 4-8-4 Steam Locomotive #5633. The steam loco was built in Burlinghton, Iowa in September 1940. She remained in service until 1956.

Visitors are invited to climb aboard many of the rail cars including a day coach, a dining car and a new caboose exhibit. Here’s a gallery of the pics he took on his visit:

Douglas Railroad Museum #1

Douglas Railroad Museum #1

Steam loco in Douglas Railroad Museum #2

Steam loco in Douglas Railroad Museum #2

Steam loco in Douglas Railroad Museum #3

Steam loco in Douglas Railroad Museum #3

Next up is the sleeping car:

Douglas Railroad Museum #4

Douglas Railroad Museum #4

Douglas Railroad Museum #5

Douglas Railroad Museum #5

Douglas Railroad Museum #6

Douglas Railroad Museum #6

Douglas Railroad Museum #7

Douglas Railroad Museum #7

Douglas Railroad Museum #8

Douglas Railroad Museum #8

Douglas Railroad Museum #9

Douglas Railroad Museum #9

The Dining Car:

Douglas Railroad Museum #10

Douglas Railroad Museum #10

Douglas Railroad Museum #11

The Caboose:

Douglas Railroad Museum #12

Douglas Railroad Museum #12

Douglas Railroad Museum #13

Douglas Railroad Museum #13

Douglas Railroad Museum #14

Douglas Railroad Museum #14

Douglas Railroad Museum #15

Douglas Railroad Museum #15

And last but not lease the Passenger Coach:

Douglas Railroad Museum #16

Douglas Railroad Museum #16

Douglas Railroad Museum #17

Douglas Railroad Museum #17

Stagecoaches used along the Mendocino Coast

A stagecoach is a four-wheeled public coach used to carry paying passengers and light packages on journeys long enough to need a change of horses. It is strongly sprung and generally drawn by four horses. Widely used before steam-powered rail transport was available a stagecoach made long scheduled trips using stage stations or posts where the stagecoach’s horses would be replaced by fresh horses.  Coachmen carried letters, packages, and money, often transacting business or delivering messages for their customers. Coaches with iron or steel springs were uncomfortable and had short useful lives. Two men in Concord, New Hampshire, developed what became a popular solution. They built their first Concord stagecoach in 1827 employing long leather straps under their stagecoaches which gave a swinging motion.

What was is like to ride one? In his 1861 book Roughing It, Mark Twain described the Concord stage’s ride as like “a cradle on wheels”. Around twenty years later in 1880 John Pleasant Gray recorded after travelling from Tucson to Tombstone on J.D. Kinnear’s mail and express line:

That day’s stage ride will always live in my memory – but not for its beauty spots. Jammed like sardines on the hard seats of an old time leather spring coach – a Concord – leaving Pantano, creeping much of the way, letting the horses walk, through miles of alkali dust that the wheels rolled up in thick clouds of which we received the full benefit … It is always a mystery to the passenger how many can be wedged into and on top of a stagecoach. If it had not been for the long stretches when the horses had to walk, enabling most of us to get out and “foot it” as a relaxation, it seems as if we could never have survived the trip.

The horses were changed three times on the 80-mile trip, normally completed in 17 hours.

Here are the pics I have gathered of stagecoaches used along the Mendocino Coast:

A four horse stagecoach

A four horse stagecoach

On stageline from present terminus of the CWR to Willits

On stageline from present terminus of the CWR to Willits

Stagecoach in Mendocino

Stagecoach in Mendocino

Stagecoach in the County Museum in Willis

Stagecoach in the County Museum in Willis

Through the woods on the road to Fort Bragg

Through the woods on the road to Fort Bragg

This vid is from the movie, “Calamity Jane,” starring Doris Day. The first scene shows you how many folks yo could cram inside.

Fish Rock – a small place on the Mendocino Coast

Fish Rock (formerly, Fishrock and Conways Landing) is an unincorporated community in Mendocino County, California. It is located 4 miles northwest of Gualala. The Conways Landing post office opened in 1870, changed its name to Fish Rock in 1871, closed in 1873, re-opened in 1885, moved in 1908, and closed for good in 1910.

All the above I got from Wiki. The bottom line is it was never very big. Google did give me a link to a really neat map:

Map showing location of Fish Rock on the Mendocino Coast

Map showing location of Fish Rock on the Mendocino Coast

So, the likelihood of finding a pic of Fish Rock is pretty small. Well, one has turned up:

Fish Rock

Fish Rock

Alas I have NO info of when it was taken.

 

 

The Caspar, South Fork & Eastern Nn3 modular logging layout at the 2019 National Narrow Gauge Convention in Sacramento, California September 4-7.

Club member Joe DuVivier models in Nn3. For anyone out there who does not know what Nn3 is I quote from the Nn3 website:

Nn3 is narrow gauge in N scale, primarily, but not exclusively using Z scale standards to represent 3ft narrow gauge railroads. While it’s obviously a minority interest, it’s followed by an increasing number of modellers worldwide.

To give you an idea of how titchy Nn3 is look at this pic:

Two Nn3 freight cars on the fingers of a hand

Two Nn3 freight cars on the fingers of a hand

Joe recently show cased Joe’s in progress Nn3 module at the recent Narrow Gauge Convention in Sacremento. Joe is creating a WORKING lumber mill modelled on the one that used to be at Caspar. The doyen of the Nn3 world is a gentleman named Tom Knapp. Twas Tom who made this vid of the first 3 modules of the The Caspar, South Fork & Eastern. For the technical:

“The Mich-Cal #2 shay (in the vid) is a Showcase Miniatures kit with a Searails Powermax power truck. The locomotive is smaller than a thumb. The log bunks are 3D printed by Tom on Shapeways. They have link and pin dummy couplers also 3D printed.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJ38WXugiSY&feature=youtu.be

Please cut and paste link to view.