Mill at Rider Gulch

Ok. Hands up everyone who knows where Rider Gulch is. Hmmm Didn’t see one hand up.

Rider Gulch is not far from Westport. Go up Wages Creek and hang a right.

Topo Map showing Rider Gulch

Topo Map showing Rider Gulch

In days of old there was a mill there. Here’s the photos that show I am telling the truth.

Rider Mill at Rider Gulch

Rider Mill at Rider Gulch

Log pond at Rider Mill at Rider Gulch

Log pond at Rider Mill at Rider Gulch

Now before you go to the next photo look back at the map. Could the log pond be the body of water in Rider Gulch near Wages Creek?

Rider Mill at Rider Gulch

Rider Mill at Rider Gulch

Until I got hold of the photos I too had never heard of Rider Gulch and I have struggled only a few yards up Wages Creek. So, if there is anyone who knows better than I please contact me.

 

 

Coloured Postcards of Caspar circa 1900

There are a LOT of photos in the main website and my three blogs. I get them from everywhere. In the fairly recent past there has been a whole bunch of coloured postcards.

“During the 19th century colorants was often added to printed images by hand for it was the most cost efficient way to produce a color image. This tradition was naturally applied to all types of postcards, and it became common practice around 1902. The general tendency of collotypes to print lightly while still capturing great detail made them the perfect receptor of hand coloring and they formed the base for most of this work. With more paper surface left exposed and a less oily ink to fight the water based colorant it could more easily show off subtle hues or attain brilliant saturation. Some publishers would even adjust the transparencies used to create collotype plates so that their cards to be colored would print lighter than the versions to be printed solely in black & white. Most postcards were colored with a simple RGB pallet but there are many variations to this. As labor costs rose the hand coloring of postcards faded out after the 1930’s.” 

So now you know when and how. Here’s the three coloured postcards I recently acquired of Caspar.

Loading at Caspar

Loading at Caspar

Caspar Harbour

Caspar Harbour

Caspar Main Street

Caspar Main Street

Map of the Caspar, South Fork& Eastern Railroad

This map first appeared tucked away in the back of a Western Railroader. It was recently the subject of some correspondence I had with a gentleman who works for Jackson State Forest. Webmaster Roger Thornburn was in on the correspondence and used his magical computer skills to enhance the original.

As historian for the club I should have been knowledgeable of the great detail on the map. Not only does the map show the location of the Caspar Lumber Company’s twenty logging camps it also shows the location of its three inclines. Not only do we get the Caspar Railroad the CWR’s railraod is shown as is the Mendocino Lumber Compamy’s railroad tracks. If that wasn’t enough you can see Route 20, Highway 1 and the Comptche Ukiah Road. Last, but not least, it shows that the choice of path for all three railroads was along the side of rivers and streams. Have a gander for yourself. You’ll need to click on the map to see all the details I have described.

Caspar, South Fork & Eastern R. R. Map

Caspar, South Fork & Eastern R. R. Map

Six Dazzling Toy Train Displays to Get You in the Holiday Spirit

These displays were chosen by the Smithsonian website. The post was written by Jennifer Nalewicki. Jennifer writes:

With the holidays chugging into full swing, what better way to get into the spirit than by seeing a display of model trains decked out for Christmas? Ever since Lionel introduced its first electronic train set in the early 1900s, model trains have become a ubiquitous part of the holidays, circling shop windows and Christmas trees in households nationwide. Here are six displays across the United States that take this beloved holiday tradition to the next level.”

Holiday Train Show, New York Botanical Garden, New York City

Housed inside the New York Botanical Garden’s 116-year-old Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, the largest Victorian glasshouse in the United States, the Holiday Train Show has been a holiday must luring locals and visitors alike to the Bronx since 1992. Now in its 26th year, the annual event serves as a miniature approximation of New York City, with pint-sized replicas of iconic structures such as the Brooklyn Bridge, One World Trade Center, Yankee Stadium and the conservatory itself, each built by hand using natural materials like twigs and tree bark. Adding to the wonder of the cityscape is nearly a half-mile of railroad tracks circumnavigating the display.

New York Botanical Gardens Holiday Train Show

New York Botanical Gardens Holiday Train Show

I have been to this one – the buildings and bridges are totally amazing.

Holiday Garden Railway, Morris Arboretum, Philadelphia

This year’s display features a quarter mile of garden-scale train tracks comprised of—wait for it—seven loops and tunnels, 15 different rail lines, two cable cars, and nine bridges, including one trestle bridge you can walk under. The jury is still out on whether or not there will be a partridge in a pear tree.

Wonderland Express, Chicago Botanic Garden

Every winter, the Chicago Botanic Garden morphs into a world of wonder during Wonderland Express, the garden’s annual holiday model-train show. Located inside Nicholas Hall, this year’s event features pieces from the garden’s growing collection of nearly 400 train cars and engines as they chug past miniature replicas of more than 80 of the city’s most recognizable buildings and landmarks, including Cloud Gate, Millennium Park and Centennial Wheel, all designed by Paul Busse of Applied Imagination (he’s also the mastermind behind the displays at the New York Botanical Garden and Morris Arboretum.)

Holiday Junction Featuring the Duke Energy Holiday Trains, Cincinnati Museum Center

Since 1946, people of all ages have made it a tradition to see the Duke Energy Holiday Trains in Cincinnati, and this year is no different. Featuring hundreds of model trains that the museum has acquired over the years, some of which date back to the early 1900s, the 9,000-square-foot display is easily one of the country’s oldest. This year’s event is in a new and updated space inside the museum, and features stylized replicas of the Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky skylines designed in Art Deco—a nod to the museum’s architectural roots.

Holiday Junction Featuring the Duke Energy Holiday Trains

Magical Holiday Express, B&O Railroad Museum, Baltimore

Located inside the museum’s cavernous roundhouse, which once served as a working passenger train car shop for the B&O Railroad, the Magical Holiday Express celebrates trains of all shapes and sizes. Climb onboard a working train and meet Frosty the Snowman, or simply marvel at the many different model trains on display.

B&O Railroad Museum, Baltimore

B&O Railroad Museum, Baltimore

Trains at NorthPark Center, Dallas

Housed inside the New York Botanical Garden’s 116-year-old Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, the largest Victorian glasshouse in the United States, the Holiday Train Show has been a holiday must luring locals and visitors alike to the Bronx since 1992. Now in its 26th year, the annual event serves as a miniature approximation of New York City, with pint-sized replicas of iconic structures such as the Brooklyn Bridge, One World Trade Center, Yankee Stadium and the conservatory itself, each built by hand using natural materials like twigs and tree bark. Adding to the wonder of the cityscape is nearly a half-mile of railroad tracks circumnavigating the display.

NorthPark Center, Dallas

NorthPark Center, Dallas

 

The Minions answer to life’s miseries

There seems to be a lot of bad news about. You can’t ignore it. What you can do – and it’s what I do – is get a dose of Minion philosophy:

835 Tuba players set new world record, playing “Silent Night”

I have NOT lost it. Read this – it was written by a man named Dale Lowe:

You have to give props to the people who picked the tuba as their school instrument.   I mean, getting it home to practice with should’ve been worth an extra credit in itself, right??!!

Plus, those kids were “all about the bass – – no treble” long before the rest of us.

A massive tuba ensemble has smashed a Guinness World Record in Kansas City – – 835 tuba players (between the ages of 11 and 86) performing “Silent Night” this past Friday . The previous record of 502 tuba players in California in 2007. (Ahem.  “Tuba-d for them…there record was broken.  Thanks…I’m here all week!)

While a few performed on a tenor version of the tuba, called a euphonium, the Guiness officials have declared it an official new world record.

And the rendition of this Christmas carol is surprisingly beautiful.   have a listen:

Did you sing along? I did!!!

Steam Ship Jeanie

In our website’s section on ships we have three pics of the S. S. Jeannie. What we knew before this blog was very little: “One of ships that plied her trade along the Mendocino Coast. She was wrecked at Point Arena in 1900.” One of the three photos we have turned up in Lynn Catlett’s amazing Facebook page, “You know you are from Mendocino if…….” Of itself that was not unusual. Many of the photos I have collected since I have been historian turn up all over the place.

One of the contributors to Lynn’s page is Chuck Ross. Chuck is incredibly knowledgeable about Elk/Greenwood which is where he grew up and where his family owned a lot of land. In addition he “works” with Lynn to add germane info to her posts. His initial comment on this pic:

S, S. Jeanie aground near Point Arena

S, S. Jeanie aground near Point Arena

Always been intrigued by this photo. Just north of Point Arena wharf. This ship was probably launched as a sailing vessel, I suspect it was square-rigged. The conversion to steam probably came later. Who she is I just cannot find out. There were too many shipwrecks at Point Arena (fifty or more) to sort this one out.” Lynn then identifies the ship as the S.S. Jeanie.Chuck responds, “Well, that would make it 1900. I cannot seem to locate another picture of her in better times.” Chuck then posts this drawing:

Drawing of the S. S. Jeanie

Drawing of the S. S. Jeanie

He also posts this newspaper cutting (you’ll need to click on it to be able to read it):

Newspaper cutting about the S.S Jeanie

Newspaper cutting about the S.S Jeanie

Lynn then notes: “I’m confused. The Jeanie was refloated at Point Arena. Then a couple of months later she was overdue but we don’t know the outcome of that trip.”

Chuck replies that the outcome of the trip was known, “We do. Just a long passage. She appears in the shipping news regularly up until this, in 1913” “This” is this cutting:

1913 cutting about the S. S. Jeanie

1913 cutting about the S. S. Jeanie

Make sure read the last para in the above cutting.

Thank you Lynn and Chuck.