Map of the Caspar, South Fork& Eastern Railroad

This map first appeared tucked away in the back of a Western Railroader. It was recently the subject of some correspondence I had with a gentleman who works for Jackson State Forest. Webmaster Roger Thornburn was in on the correspondence and used his magical computer skills to enhance the original.

As historian for the club I should have been knowledgeable of the great detail on the map. Not only does the map show the location of the Caspar Lumber Company’s twenty logging camps it also shows the location of its three inclines. Not only do we get the Caspar Railroad the CWR’s railraod is shown as is the Mendocino Lumber Compamy’s railroad tracks. If that wasn’t enough you can see Route 20, Highway 1 and the Comptche Ukiah Road. Last, but not least, it shows that the choice of path for all three railroads was along the side of rivers and streams. Have a gander for yourself. You’ll need to click on the map to see all the details I have described.

Caspar, South Fork & Eastern R. R. Map

Caspar, South Fork & Eastern R. R. Map

Irmulco when it was the end of line from Fort Bragg

The name Irmulco comes from Ireland Murray Lumber Company. The company started out in 1902 with a small steam powered sawmill in Two Rock Valley, six miles west of Willits. Lonzo Irvine and Henry Muir ran this mill until 1909 when the supply of readily available timber was exhausted. The operation was moved along the Noyo River where it ran until 1923.

Prior to the line from Fort Bragg going  all the way “over the hill” to Willits it ended at Irmulco. To travel the last sixteen miles to Willits passengers had to alight and catch a stage.

The stage waiting for passengers to alight at Irmulco

The stage waiting for passengers to alight at Irmulco

Better them than me!

Laying Track in the Woods in Oregon

I belong to a Facebook page called, “Steam in the Woods.” The page is the “property” of Martin Hansen who appears to have a vast library of old logging photos. Most of his posts, whilst very interesting in their own right, do not have relevance to logging along the Mendocino Coast. Once in a while one comes up which really catches my eye …..  like this one:

Laying Track in Oregon in 1907

Laying Track in Oregon in 1907

First Martin’s comments on the pic:

This scene captures Oregon Lumber Co. Shay #101 CN#1884 blt. 1907, on a track laying operation. The ties are up front because 2 men can carry ties back to the new grade. The rails are on the flat at the rear ready to be pulled off again by hand. This is a ritual that was repeated, over and over again for construction of logging spurs. The reverse procedure was then repeated many times to pull up the track laid perhaps only 1 or 2 seasons past once the surrounding area was cut. The image is from the SVRR Archives collections.

This is the only pic I have seen of track laying in the woods. Whilst this photo was taken in Oregon I can’t imagine it was much different along the Mendocino Coast.

 

Fern Flat – pics taken somewhere along the CWR (Skunk Line) when the CWR was the California Western Railroad and Navigation Company

Nope, I don’t know where it was although my suspicion is that it was somewhere between Fort Bragg and Northspur. The originals were very poor quality sepia prints. I have converted them to grayscale and enhanced them. If anyone knows owt about where it is I’d appreciate knowing.

Fern Flat

Fern Flat

Ferns in Fern Flat

Ferns in Fern Flat

Crowley – a stop along the Skunk train route

Crowley was 32.6 miles from Fort Bragg. It was the site of a logging camp owned by a French man. He had a love of tennis and imported clay to build a tennis court. Until relatively recently the camp at Crowley was intact. It consisted of five bunkhouses, a mess hall and the foreman’s quarters. That’s all we know and heretofore NO pics. Well, this isn’t quite a pic of Crowley but it is a pic taken at Crowley.

Camp Crowley Surveyors Camp

Camp Crowley Surveyors Camp