The Log Cabin Bar in Fort Bragg

I am the historian of the train club here in Fort Bragg so you would think that I know a bit about the town as it was. Now, I confess I gave up drinking more years ago than I can remember so I have no real interest in bars. I do know though that there were a lot of bars and a lot of brothels in Fort Bragg “for the boys” when they came in from the woods. One, the Golden West, still exists just as it was back then. Based on the pic below the Log Cabin Bar was pretty well known/famous. Alas, until I saw the photo I had never heard of it. So, can anybody help me out with more info/history?

Interior of the Log Cabin Bar in Fort Bragg, CA.

Interior of the Log Cabin Bar in Fort Bragg, CA.

Pudding Creek

When I come from my home to the club’s layout I pass over Pudding Creek. Nobody seems to know how it got its name. There seems to be no connection to any Pomo Native American name. The best guess is that the original name was, “Put it in” creek and that was corrupted to Pudding.

The first lumber mill to the north Fort Bragg was beside Pudding Creek – see picture below taken about 1897.

Mill beside Pudding Creek in 1897

Mill beside Pudding Creek in 1897

To service the mill Pudding Creek was dammed.  In the bottom right hand corner of the pic below you can see the dam. Behind this dam there used to be a huge log pond which held up to 20 million feet of timber as this picture shows.

Pudding Creek Log Pond

Pudding Creek Log Pond

After the mill was closed the dam was left. The only change waqs to add a fish jump as you can see below:

Pudding Creek dam before the pond became overgrown

Pudding Creek dam before the pond became overgrown

And today?

Puddding Creek dam after a rain storm

Puddding Creek dam after a rain storm

Map of the Caspar, South Fork& Eastern Railroad

This map first appeared tucked away in the back of a Western Railroader. It was recently the subject of some correspondence I had with a gentleman who works for Jackson State Forest. Webmaster Roger Thornburn was in on the correspondence and used his magical computer skills to enhance the original.

As historian for the club I should have been knowledgeable of the great detail on the map. Not only does the map show the location of the Caspar Lumber Company’s twenty logging camps it also shows the location of its three inclines. Not only do we get the Caspar Railroad the CWR’s railraod is shown as is the Mendocino Lumber Compamy’s railroad tracks. If that wasn’t enough you can see Route 20, Highway 1 and the Comptche Ukiah Road. Last, but not least, it shows that the choice of path for all three railroads was along the side of rivers and streams. Have a gander for yourself. You’ll need to click on the map to see all the details I have described.

Caspar, South Fork & Eastern R. R. Map

Caspar, South Fork & Eastern R. R. Map