Planet Jupiter: Spectacular picture of Jupiter’s storms

I’m a space pics freak – I admit it! This Beeb (BBC) item is simply spectacular. Here’s the blurb that goes with the fab pic:

This beautiful picture of Jupiter was assembled from three separate images acquired by Nasa’s Juno spacecraft as it made another of its close passes of the gas giant. The probe has a colour camera onboard and citizen scientists are encouraged to play with the data to make their own views of the planet. This one, which is colour-enhanced, was produced by Kevin M Gill.

The US space agency has dubbed it “Jupiter Marble” – a reference to the full disc pictures of Earth captured by satellites down the years that have been called “Blue Marble”.

The Jupiter mosaic includes shots taken between 26,900 km and 95,400 km from the planet’s cloud-tops. It gives a great view of southern hemisphere storms and of the famous Great Red Spot. This spectacular anticyclone, which has been in existence for hundreds of years, is gradually having its secrets revealed by the Juno mission. The probe has already established that its roots extend at least 350 km down into the atmosphere. Scientists hope their various investigations will reveal the key mechanisms that drove the spot and keep it from dissipating.

The Juno mission operates a raw image site where amateur processors can get involved.”

Double click on the image to see it in its munificence.

Jupiter

Jupiter

Super Blood Wolf Moon

Alas it was cloudy here in Fort Bragg, CA yesterday evening and I only got to see an itsy bitsy bit of the lunar eclipse. This evening I have been having a great old time “thumbing” through photos of the event taken by those who a) have better cameras than I and b) who know how to use them. Here’s my pick of what I have perused [click on any photo to see full size]:

Super Blood Wolf Moon #1

Super Blood Wolf Moon #1

Super Blood Wolf Moon #2

Super Blood Wolf Moon #2

Super Blood Wool Moon #3

Super Blood Wool Moon #3

Super Blood Wool Moon #4

Super Blood Wool Moon #4

How about them apples!!!!!

The Man in the Moon

Do you know where to look? Neither did I.

In the weather section of this morning’s Press Democrat was a squib, “It’s a gibbous moon. (It) shows the man in the moon, Can you see it?” That set me going. I found these three pics which will help you find his face the next time you look:

Here’s the same pic minus explanation …..

See if you can see the face

See if you can see the face

And here is an enhanced photo that shows you exactly what he looks like:

The man in the moon

The man in the moon

Bloodshot eyes? Been in a fight again?

Lunar Eclipse

The recent lunar eclipse got me going. Alas, going to the Southern Hemisphere to watch was out of the question. So, I have had the dragnet out for spectacular photos. Here’s my haul:

Photo shopped? if it is it's still a great shot

Photo shopped? If it is it’s still a great shot

Great time lapse photo

Great time lapse photo

Is the end near?

Is the end near?

This explains it all

This explains it all

 

Claude Debussy’s Clair de Lune (Moonlight) plus a visit to the moon

I love piano music. I have five different renditions of Clair de Lune. The one on the following vid is as good as it gets. The piece was published in 1905 as the third of four movements in the composer’s Suite Bergamasque, and unlike the other parts of this work, Clair is quiet, contemplative, and slightly melancholy, evoking the feeling of a solitary walk through a moonlit garden.

The visualization in the vid? “The visuals were composed like a nature documentary, with clean cuts and a mostly stationary virtual camera. The viewer follows the Sun throughout a lunar day, seeing sunrises and then sunsets over prominent features on the Moon. The sprawling ray system surrounding Copernicus crater, for example, is revealed beneath receding shadows at sunrise and later slips back into darkness as night encroaches. The visualization was created to accompany a performance of Clair de Lune by the National Symphony Orchestra Pops, led by conductor Emil de Cou, at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC, on June 1 and 2, 2018, as part of a celebration of NASA’s 60th anniversary. The visualization uses a digital 3D model of the Moon built from Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter global elevation maps and image mosaics. The lighting is derived from actual Sun angles during lunar days in 2018.

The vid lasts about 5 mins:

Thanks to wife for the heads up on this one. Thanks NASA for creating the vid,

 

2017 Solar Eclipse

The recent solar eclipse was a total bust here in foggy Fort Bragg in Northern California. Exciting as it was it was not exciting enough for me to traipse 300 miles to Oregon to see it. So, I have been paging through my favorite sites looking for pics of the eclipse. There are lots but these three particularly turned me on.

Far away

Far away

Closer

Closer – look at the flares

Bingo - what a shot!!!!

Bingo – what a shot!!!!

Mesmerizing. Breathtaking what?

Crescent Supermoon vs Full Mini-moon

The moon fascinates me – it always has. I think my fascination comes from watching the moon when I was a kid in hospital. It’s only recently that I have begun to understand just how it is the same old moon and look so different. This piece from Space Weather is my latest piece of erudition:

The Moon’s orbit is an ellipse, with one side 50,000 km closer to Earth than the other. This has an effect on the apparent size of the Moon. The lunar disk grows larger when the Moon is nearby and smaller when far away. In the past two weeks we have witnessed two extremes–a crescent supermoon followed by a full ‘mini-Moon.’ Peter Lowenstein of Mutare, Zimbabwe, photographed them both:

Supermoon and Mini-moon

Supermoon and Mini-moon

The size difference was so great, the crescent Moon of May 27th could hold the full Moon of June 9th with room to spare!” says Lowenstein. “I took these photographs from the same location in Mutare using the same optical zoom setting (x60) on the same Panasonic Lumix DMC TZ-60 camera within two hours of moonset.”

Some people say that mini-Moons and supermoons all appear to be the same size.  After all, there are no rulers floating in the sky to measure lunar diameters, and without reference points to provide a sense of scale, one Moon can indeed look much like any other. However, Lowenstein’s photo shows there is a real difference.”