Copenhagen Fields 2mm/ft Finescale Model Railway

Club Member Joe DuVivier sent me this e-mail and three photos:

Tom Knapp and I are working on perspective distorted buildings for my Caspar project. You have to look at the second photo full screen as it is a magnificent panorama. The sense of depth of the scene is unmatched in model railroading. Tom was one of the contributors to this continuing effort. This layout is one of my must-sees when I go to England in 2022 for the National Model Railroad Association annual convention.

An interesting story about this layout, told by one of the group who created it: at a train show in Great Britain an old man was overheard talking to a boy about this display layout, Copenhagen Fields. The old man said he recognized the place. During Word War II he, then a German bomber pilot, had flown over this place and dropped his bomb load.”

Here are the photos – PLEASE click on them to see them at their best – the originals are VERY large and take a bit to load – have patience – it’s worth it.

Copenhagen Fields Layout

Copenhagen Fields Layout

 

Copenhagen Fields Layout

Copenhagen Fields Layout

Copenhagen Fields Layout

Copenhagen Fields Layout

Tom Knapp wrote this note to Joe:

“The three photos of the Copenhagen Fields layout below were taken at a weekend show in the UK. The last photo shows the back side of the building I built which has the very ornate brick façade on the street side. Tim Watson built the “demolished” building which fills in the odd space on Randall Road.

Note the very hazy effect of the backdrop. It is realistic without taking your eyes off the buildings. And the background structures have less and less detail and the scale decreases the further away from the front, until the ones at the back are basically just massing models.”

Thanks Joe.

Here’s a short vid of the layout:

The grey patches surrounding the rail lines are allotments. Allotments are small amounts of land rented by locals from the Council to grow veg and flowers.

My comment, totally amazing.

 

 

The Sundance Central Railroad – G scale modular layuout

When I got the “heads up” on this layout from club member Ben Sochacki my immediate thought was, “‘allo, allo” there’s something familiar about this name/layout. Sure nuff I have blogged it before thasnks to a heads up from Chuck Whitlock. I commend you to look at that blog before you plow on with this one.

A bit about the Sundance Central before I get to the vid that Ben recommended.

The Sundance was formed in January 2004 with the goal to create a more detailed and uniformly scened, large-scale traveling layout. This 1:20.3 scale modular model railroad consisting of forty modules for a layout size of 45 feet by 45 feet. The railroad consists of 400 feet of hand laid code 250 aluminum rails that are hand spiked with individual tie plates onto wood ties with a total of 16 turn-outs. The modular was built by a group of seven model train enthusiasts. This diverse group is made up of people who have a passion of early narrow gauge steam locomotives to modern day standard gauge diesels. The purpose for forming this modular group was to provide the public a realistic look at model railroading in a large-scale format. The modules are highly detailed from the scratch built supporting structures and buildings down to the surrounding scenery. The trains and rolling stock that run on these modules are highly detailed and weathered.

Here’s the vid:

Thanks Ben.

G scale model railroad The Cascade & Silverton built and filmed by Ron Keiser

This one came onto the radar courtesy of club member Ben Sochacki. Here’s the e-mail that set me in motion:

This vid has a car in it similar to one we  [our model railroad club] just acquired which I’ve never seen the likes of. Looks like a truck that runs the rails. See if you can spot it.”

The vid is beautifully filmed. It’s quite long – 18 mins. So if you want to see the “truck that runs on rails” go to the 9 mins 20 secs spot. The truck that runs on rails is a Galloping Goose.

Galloping Goose is the popular name given to a series of seven railcars (officially designated as “motors” by the railroad), built in the 1930s by the Rio Grande Southern Railroad (RGS) and operated until the end of service on the line in the early 1950s. Originally running steam locomotives on narrow gauge railways, the perpetually struggling RGS developed the first of the “geese” as a way to stave off bankruptcy and keep its contract to run mail into towns in the Rocky Mountains in Colorado. There was not enough passenger or cargo income to justify continuing the expensive steam train service at then-current levels, but it was believed that a downsized railway would return to profitability. The steam trains would transport heavy cargo and peak passenger loads, but motors would handle lighter loads. Motors were not only less expensive to operate, but were also significantly lighter, thus reducing impact on the rails and roadbeds. This cost saving meant that the first Goose was paid off and making a profit within three weeks of going into service. RGS built more Geese, and operated them until the company abandoned their right-of-way in 1952.

The club’s Goose is currently being modified so that it runs on battery power rather than being powered by electricity through the rails.

 

Columbia Gorge Model Railroad Club in Portland, OR

Wife Sarah and I met club member Ben Sochacki in the driveway to to the club layout today. We asked him how his hols in Portland had gone. He told us about his visit to the Oregon Heritage Centre – see this blog. He gushed over a visit he had made to “The largest HO layout in the Western United States.” Whilst the layout was officially closed debonair Ben talked his way in to an abfab tour. Here’s what he saw/heard:

Great music too!!

After I posted this blog I got this e-mail from Ben:

Last Saturday my brother Tim and I had the privilege of getting a private tour of this club’s layout. Member Fred Russell walked and talked his way through every floor, and inch, of this amazing display. In fact the building itself was designed and built specifically to this HO layout. 3 1/2 hours later we were virtually spent. Next time you are in downtown Portland be sure to check it out.”

Six Dazzling Toy Train Displays to Get You in the Holiday Spirit

These displays were chosen by the Smithsonian website. The post was written by Jennifer Nalewicki. Jennifer writes:

With the holidays chugging into full swing, what better way to get into the spirit than by seeing a display of model trains decked out for Christmas? Ever since Lionel introduced its first electronic train set in the early 1900s, model trains have become a ubiquitous part of the holidays, circling shop windows and Christmas trees in households nationwide. Here are six displays across the United States that take this beloved holiday tradition to the next level.”

Holiday Train Show, New York Botanical Garden, New York City

Housed inside the New York Botanical Garden’s 116-year-old Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, the largest Victorian glasshouse in the United States, the Holiday Train Show has been a holiday must luring locals and visitors alike to the Bronx since 1992. Now in its 26th year, the annual event serves as a miniature approximation of New York City, with pint-sized replicas of iconic structures such as the Brooklyn Bridge, One World Trade Center, Yankee Stadium and the conservatory itself, each built by hand using natural materials like twigs and tree bark. Adding to the wonder of the cityscape is nearly a half-mile of railroad tracks circumnavigating the display.

New York Botanical Gardens Holiday Train Show

New York Botanical Gardens Holiday Train Show

I have been to this one – the buildings and bridges are totally amazing.

Holiday Garden Railway, Morris Arboretum, Philadelphia

This year’s display features a quarter mile of garden-scale train tracks comprised of—wait for it—seven loops and tunnels, 15 different rail lines, two cable cars, and nine bridges, including one trestle bridge you can walk under. The jury is still out on whether or not there will be a partridge in a pear tree.

Wonderland Express, Chicago Botanic Garden

Every winter, the Chicago Botanic Garden morphs into a world of wonder during Wonderland Express, the garden’s annual holiday model-train show. Located inside Nicholas Hall, this year’s event features pieces from the garden’s growing collection of nearly 400 train cars and engines as they chug past miniature replicas of more than 80 of the city’s most recognizable buildings and landmarks, including Cloud Gate, Millennium Park and Centennial Wheel, all designed by Paul Busse of Applied Imagination (he’s also the mastermind behind the displays at the New York Botanical Garden and Morris Arboretum.)

Holiday Junction Featuring the Duke Energy Holiday Trains, Cincinnati Museum Center

Since 1946, people of all ages have made it a tradition to see the Duke Energy Holiday Trains in Cincinnati, and this year is no different. Featuring hundreds of model trains that the museum has acquired over the years, some of which date back to the early 1900s, the 9,000-square-foot display is easily one of the country’s oldest. This year’s event is in a new and updated space inside the museum, and features stylized replicas of the Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky skylines designed in Art Deco—a nod to the museum’s architectural roots.

Holiday Junction Featuring the Duke Energy Holiday Trains

Magical Holiday Express, B&O Railroad Museum, Baltimore

Located inside the museum’s cavernous roundhouse, which once served as a working passenger train car shop for the B&O Railroad, the Magical Holiday Express celebrates trains of all shapes and sizes. Climb onboard a working train and meet Frosty the Snowman, or simply marvel at the many different model trains on display.

B&O Railroad Museum, Baltimore

B&O Railroad Museum, Baltimore

Trains at NorthPark Center, Dallas

Housed inside the New York Botanical Garden’s 116-year-old Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, the largest Victorian glasshouse in the United States, the Holiday Train Show has been a holiday must luring locals and visitors alike to the Bronx since 1992. Now in its 26th year, the annual event serves as a miniature approximation of New York City, with pint-sized replicas of iconic structures such as the Brooklyn Bridge, One World Trade Center, Yankee Stadium and the conservatory itself, each built by hand using natural materials like twigs and tree bark. Adding to the wonder of the cityscape is nearly a half-mile of railroad tracks circumnavigating the display.

NorthPark Center, Dallas

NorthPark Center, Dallas

 

York (England) Model Railway Show 2018

English model railway shows are a completely different experience to any I have visited here in the USA. One of my pleasures is watching vids of the English shows. This vid – 1 of 4 – is of the York Railway show. As you will see there are a variety of scales depicted. A word of warning – the vid is 20 minutes long. My favorite layout is one named “Behind the Lines” and shows the “action” behind the lines in World War I. It’s at the 17 min 55 sec mark.

High Sierra Model Train Club in Chico

A gentleman came to the layout last Saturday and told me that I should come to Chico to see the High Sierra Model Railroad club’s layout. I declined on two accounts – (a) it is hot as hades in Chico and (b) for an old phart like me a long way to go. He went on to invite me to view the vids of the layout on YouTube. This one has instantly gone to near the top of my model railroad vids – see for yourself:

The second vid is much longer but for those Club Members who are ex SP this one will surely appeal.

I tried to find a website for the club but failed to do so. So, sorry, can’t give you a heads up.

This is part of an e-mail that I received from club member Mike Aplet:

“[This] is a video of an excellent hillside model train layout that very much approximates our west wall. I didn’t bother to check on which scale it is. I simply was impressed by the realistic landscape details including rock and foliage. The scale doesn’t matter.”

Hope the link works as it is to Facebook:

GEOFF NOTT

FIRST TIME i MET GEOFF NOTT IN 1998. tHIS IS VERY OLD ANALOG FOOTAGE OF THAT DAY. LlAYOUT HAS SINCE BEEN DESTROYED..Enjoy "what was" , but was recorded for an inspiration to others

Posted by Miniature Dioramas, Modelling, Structures & Scenery on Thursday, January 25, 2018

Great layout …… I got several ideas for our layout whilst watching.