Coloured Postcards of Caspar circa 1900

There are a LOT of photos in the main website and my three blogs. I get them from everywhere. In the fairly recent past there has been a whole bunch of coloured postcards.

“During the 19th century colorants was often added to printed images by hand for it was the most cost efficient way to produce a color image. This tradition was naturally applied to all types of postcards, and it became common practice around 1902. The general tendency of collotypes to print lightly while still capturing great detail made them the perfect receptor of hand coloring and they formed the base for most of this work. With more paper surface left exposed and a less oily ink to fight the water based colorant it could more easily show off subtle hues or attain brilliant saturation. Some publishers would even adjust the transparencies used to create collotype plates so that their cards to be colored would print lighter than the versions to be printed solely in black & white. Most postcards were colored with a simple RGB pallet but there are many variations to this. As labor costs rose the hand coloring of postcards faded out after the 1930’s.” 

So now you know when and how. Here’s the three coloured postcards I recently acquired of Caspar.

Loading at Caspar

Loading at Caspar

Caspar Harbour

Caspar Harbour

Caspar Main Street

Caspar Main Street

Branscomb, California

Where is Branscome?

Map showing whereabouts of Branscomb California

Map showing whereabouts of Branscomb California

It’s not a good map but I think you can see that it’s close to Westport and Laytonville. According to Wiki, “Branscom b is an unincorporated community in Mendocino County. It’s located 8 miles west-southwest of Laytonville.”

I knew there was once a mill but that’s about it. Wiki though has a nice piece of history:

Benjamin Franklin Branscomb joined an ox-team wagon train that was headed for California in 1857. He was born in Jackson, Ohio, in 1832, the son of Joseph Edmond Branscomb. The family moved to DeKalb County, Missouri, where Joseph became Sheriff. According to family tradition, Joseph, a staunch abolitionist, was shot and killed 3 days before President Lincoln was assassinated, but a contemporary newspaper account says Joseph was shot to death by a Mr. Jacob J. Stoffel in Maysville in July 1865, several months after Lincoln’s assassination.

Benjamin later settled in Sonoma County and farmed there for about twenty years. He married one of the daughters of the captain of the wagon train, Mary Jane Taylor, and they had 10 children: 6 boys and 4 girls. They moved to Jackson Valley, Mendocino, in 1880, where he homesteaded 160 acres of land and 40 acres more under the Timber Act. He was instrumental in starting the first school in that area. He built a large home which, after his family grew up, he turned into a hotel. A small grocery store, meat market and livery stable were added later. After more people came into the area, he established a post office, which first opened in 1894. Since the place had no official name, it was named after him, the postmaster. After his death in 1921, one of his sons, John, inherited the property and ran it until 1959, when he sold it to the Harwood family, who built the timber mill in Branscomb called Harwood Products. Unfortunately in the year 2007 the mill filed bankruptcy, eventually closing its doors for good in 2008. The Branscomb store along with the post office, officially closed few years after in 2016.”

I have never seen a photo of the mill. I have just one photo which I suspect was taken way before the mill came.

Branscomb, CA

Branscomb, CA

Just a leeetel bit more of our local history.

 

 

 

 

Remnants of logging activities from over a hundred and ten years ago can be seen in the Gualala River.

Gualala. If you pronounce the “G” they know you are a visitor. Gualala it seems was not always Gualala but also Walahlee, Walalla and Walhalla.  Gualala is the last “stop” at the southern end of the Mendocino Coast Redwood Empire. Gualala is a Pomo name meaning “where the waters flow down.” There was a mill there which was owned by Haywood R. Harmon in Gualala which was located at the mouth of Mill Gulch, now known as China Gulch.

Is there anything left of the mill I ask?

This article. which I found on a site called Mendocino Sightings, provides an answer the my question:

Bill Oxford used his drone to photograph the estuary of the Gualala River. This is what he found – several wooden structures in the riverbed.

Old mill crib logs in the-Gualala River by Bill Oxford

Old mill crib logs in the-Gualala River by Bill Oxford

Bill wondered if these structures were part of the old mill at the site we call Mill Bend. Here is a photo of the old mill.

Gualala Mill from park-courtesy of Harry-Lindstrom

Gualala Mill from park-courtesy of Harry-Lindstrom

Harry Lindstrom knew what they were. He wrote, “These are remnants of old log cribs. If you are kayaking, you might mistake these old remnants for trees, or you may not even pay attention to them if the water is deep enough. Most of them are stuck in the mud, pointing out at an angle. The lumber mill at Mill Bend was not pushed into the river; it burned in 1906.” Harry sent along these photos showing the remnants: 

Close up of old log cribsin the Gualala River -by-Harry-Lindstrom

Close up of old log cribsin the Gualala River -by-Harry-Lindstrom

Old log cribs in the estuary of the Gualala River by Harry-Lindstrom

Old log cribs in the estuary of the Gualala River by Harry-Lindstrom

Wayne Harris, owner of Adventures Rents, the kayaking company on the Gualala River, also knew what they were. He wrote, “Bill’s photo shows some of the cribs that were built to contain the floating logs. There are four or five areas in the estuary where one can still see them. They were logs pinned together with stakes to create a dock-like structure to hold back the floating timber.”

So there you go – a little bit of history still evident in the Gualala River.

Thanks to Bill and Harry for allowing me to share their photos with you here.” 

Irmulco when it was the end of line from Fort Bragg

The name Irmulco comes from Ireland Murray Lumber Company. The company started out in 1902 with a small steam powered sawmill in Two Rock Valley, six miles west of Willits. Lonzo Irvine and Henry Muir ran this mill until 1909 when the supply of readily available timber was exhausted. The operation was moved along the Noyo River where it ran until 1923.

Prior to the line from Fort Bragg going  all the way “over the hill” to Willits it ended at Irmulco. To travel the last sixteen miles to Willits passengers had to alight and catch a stage.

The stage waiting for passengers to alight at Irmulco

The stage waiting for passengers to alight at Irmulco

Better them than me!

Loading lumber at Westport, CA in the 1890’s

Whether this pic is what it says, “Loading lumber at Westport, CA in the 1890’s” may not be correct. The sailing schooner seems to be too close to the shore to be Westport and the view of the town through the rigging doesn’t seem quite right either. Be that as it may this pic is another tiny sliver of  local Mendocino Coast History:

Loading lumber at Westport CA. in the 1890's

Loading lumber at Westport CA. in the 1890’s

Kibesillah, Mother of Fort Bragg

Kibesillah is pronounced cab-huh-silluh. Depending who you talk to the name is either from the Pomo words Kabe (rock) and sila (flat) or it means “Head of the Valley”. Kibesillah was also known as  “The Mother of Fort Bragg”

This edited article comes from a website called, “Mendocino in my heart.””

“To walk the rolling hills in this lush area 12 miles north of Fort Bragg, it’s difficult to imagine the   bustling towns of Kibesillah and Newport that once overlooked the Pacific Ocean. Although many people may not know it, Fort Bragg is the direct descendant of Kibesillah.”

So wrote Budd Salsig in his article, “Kibesillah, Mother of Fort Bragg,” in the 1935 Fort Bragg High School yearbook, Breath of Ocean. Budd Salsig’s family were pioneers in Pt. Arena, south of Mendocino. Many have written or excerpted articles about Kibesillah and Newport, but Budd Salsig’s description is one of the more colorful:

“In its prime, Kibesillah consisted of numerous hotels, a couple of stores, several harness shops, a church and a   generous complement of saloons. Its chief support was its business in lumber, ties, bark and posts. The sawmill that had been erected at Kibesillah was very soon moved to Ten Mile. The mill didn’t run during the rainy season, and during that time the saloons were overflowing with gamblers, drunken tie makers and other mill employees. Stacks of $20 gold pieces decorated tables everywhere. The population went around dressed most viciously, usually carrying large knives or pistols.”

Kibesillah and the neighboring town of Newport were definitely wild Western towns, but they were not uncivilized. Kibesillah was home to a weekly newspaper, the North Coast Review, and the district office for the North Pacific Telegraph Company. More than one church thrived in Kibesillah, and by 1878, the Blue Ribbon Temperance League had a firm grip on the town. Newport, its neighbor one mile to the south, was the site of the lumber chute and sawmill and, at various times, the company store, the power plant and the foreman’s house.”

And today? Nowt, not even a sign. This pic may well show all that’s left:

tween Kibisillah and Westport

Barn between Kibisillah and Westport

From Wages Creek to Westport by Train for the first time on November 21st, 1917

Westport still exists. Wages Creek exists only as a sign. They were/are north of Fort Bragg along CA Route 1. The map below (courtesy of our webmaster Roger Thornburn) shows the road between the two places today.

Westport and Wages Creek from a USGS Topo Map

Westport and Wages Creek from a USGS Topo Map

Now let me quote you a clip from the Fort Bragg Advocate of November 21, 1917,

The driving of the golden spike was quite an event Saturday afternoon. The railroad was completed and the train came in bringing all Hickey’s men from Wages Creek. George Fee drove the spike and Judge Roach spoke a few words in honour of the railroad and Mr. Hickey then treated all the ladies and children to candy and the men to cigars. Mr Hickey rented the moving picture house from Mr Ramsdell and invited everyone to a free show. There was a large crowd.

I confess …… I didn’t this little seven mile railroad existed. But, it did as this map (exhumed by Roger Thornburn) shows:

Westport to Wages Creek Railroad Map

Westport to Wages Creek Railroad Map

Another little bit o’ history!

Clare Mill – a used to be stop on the Skunk Route from Fort Bragg to Willits

What do we know about Clare Mill. Not a heck of a lot. The website tells us that Clare Mill was 30.4 miles from the Fort Bragg depot. In the early 1900’s railroad ties were made by hand here. There was also a trestle bridge here that at 600 feet long and 73 feet high was comparable to the Pudding Creek Trestle. It was replaced with an earth-filled berm in 1936. Until the Skunk line finally made it “over the hill” to Willits this was the end of the line. To get to Willits back then a passenger would board an open buckboard stage for a five hour trip (in good weather!). And, heretofore – NO pic. Well the pic I recently came across doesn’t tell us a whole lot absent acknowledging Clare mill did exist.

Clare Mill sign

Clare Mill sign